I’m hit; go on without me…

I’ve been reading blogs lately as well as writing one. Blogistic Digression made this point the other day: “Redeploying workers instead of cutting headcount during tough economic times can save your business millions of dollars in employment costs, according to Human Capital Management Solutions CEO, Trevor Vas.”

That may be the case, but while I will not (cannot) discuss particulars of my former employer or my separation from same, it is public knowledge that the organization went through a number of money-saving moves before making the difficult choice of letting people go.

I’ve been on several sides of this issue. I’ve hired and fired, I’ve been hired and fired. I’ve had to comb through budgets, trying to determine ways to maintain a certain level of operation while finding ways to save money. I understand that eventually, remaining a viable business can mean reducing staff. And even if you’ve been lucky enough to get out of the way of the dodgeball, sometimes it’s gonna smack you right in the gob.

Would I prefer to be transfered to another job rather than let go? Yes, if I knew those were my only options. Even if it were a job I didn’t particularly want. What if it came down to having to leave if it meant others would still have jobs? That’s a lot tougher to answer.

Could I be the brave soldier in the war movie who tells his buddies to take the hill as he bleeds out on ground? It’s much more likely I’d be grabbing somebody by the collar and insisting they carry me back to safety. It’s a little easier after the fact; that is, I know someone had to go. Better me now than a lot more people down the road.

To paraphrase what Rick told Ilsa in Casablanca, I’m no good at being noble, but it doesn’t take much to see that the problems of one little person doesn’t amount to a hill of beans in this crazy world. Someday I’ll understand that.

Of course, this feigned nobility relies on the economy not forcing any more layoffs. No one should have to go through something like this.

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About Doug Johnson

I spent 25 years in the news business, working in print, radio and television. After a steady rise to the middle, I made the leap to the private sector, which chewed and then tried spitting me out after 2 years. I zigged (instead of zagging) into a position in television production.
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